Peter Schweitzer on climate change in the uni:view Magazin

Social and cultural anthropologist Peter Schweitzer talks about why climate change is interesting for anthropologists in the current issue of Uni Vienna’s uni:view Magazin. The interview addresses the “Semesterfrage” – the question of the semester: “How can we save our climate?”.

Read the article here.

High North News writes about APRIs’ 5th Anniversary

High North News wrote about the APRI and the celebration of its fifth anniversary in Vienna in April. You can read the article here.

FWF START grant – great success for Gina Moseley!

Gina Moseley, geographer and FWF Hertha Firnberg Fellow at the Department of Geology at the University of Innsbruck and member of the APRI Faculty, was awarded the €1.1 million grant for her outstanding research on speleothems in North-East Greenland. The project aims at a better understanding of climate change in the Arctic through the study of sinter deposits in caves, also known as speleothems. Speleothems are unique climate archive providing invaluable insights into past periods of changing climate, thus adding new perspectives to the field of paleoclimatology. In particular, the planned research has a very high potential to extend the understanding of climate change in Greenland for periods not covered by ice cores from the Greenland Ice Sheet. The grant will allow Moseley to establish an arctic speleothem working group and to expand speleothem research, which to date has been focused on lower latitudes, to the Arctic.

 

 

 

 

 

The FWF START Programme provides outstanding young researchers from any discipline with extensive financial security to plan long-term research and to build up or consolidate their own research groups.

The APRI Steering Committee cordially congratulates Gina Moseley!

You can read more about Gina’s project and the other awarded projects and grantees here.

Fifth Anniversary of the Austrian Polar Research Institute

The Austrian Polar Research Institute celebrated its fifth Anniversary on April 10th. Approximately 80 people joined the celebration in the Sky Lounge of the University of Vienna. The highlight of the evening was the keynote by glaciologist Jason Box who gave a thought-provocing talk on climate change and its effects on the Greenlandic ice sheet. The audience was given a glimpse into the history and the aims of the APRI, and a short film and poster exhibition provided insights into research activities currently being carried out by members of the institute. The party continued over some wine and snacks.

 

 

 

 

 

photos by Alexandra Meyer

 

 

 

Jason Box on FM4

As a teaser for tonight’s keynote by Jason Box at the 5th Anniversary of the Austrian Polar Research Institute, you can now tune in on FM4 and listen to him talk about the Dark Snow project and the melting Arctic:

Climate scientist Jason Box and the Dark Snow Project | Reality Check, 10.4. | Radio FM4 | @radiofm4

http://fm4.ORF.at/player/20180410/RC/133937

Hope to see many of you tonight!

Fifth Anniversary of the Austrian Polar Research Institute

The Austrian Polar Research Institute celebrates its fifth Anniversary on April 10th in the Sky-Lounge of the University of Vienna, Oscar-Morgenstern-Platz 1, 1090 Vienna. We are happy to announce that Jason Box, professor in glaciology at the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland will give a keynote on “Arctic land ice and global sea level” for the occasion. Furthermore, members of the APRI will give an insight into the past and future research activities of the Institute, and a poster exhibition will provide a glimpse into current research project of the different APRI working groups. Afterwards there will be an informal reception.

We hope to see many of you there!

The program can be viewed here:

Program APRI Anniversary

 

The uni:view Magazin on Andreas Richter’s research on permafrost

How is permafrost related to climate change? This article in the uni:view Magazin provides an insight into the research of Andreas Richter and his team on the permafrost-climate feedback.

 

 

 

Polar Talk #1 in the Museum of Natural History, Vienna

On the 17th of January the first Polar Talk of the Austrian Polar Research Institute took place in the Museum of Natural History, Vienna. Dr. Gertrude Saxinger spoke about the First Nations in Canada’s Yukon Territory and their relationship to the mining industry. Over 40 people found their way to the museum for the evening and contributed to a lively discussion after the talk. Afterwards, drinks and snacks were enjoyed in the entrance hall of the beautiful museum. APRI wishes to thank all visitors and the museum for a pleasant evening!

Dr. Gertrude Saxinger speaks about the First Nations in Canada’s Yukon Territory and their relationship to the mining industry. Photo: Robert Gebauer

Photo: Robert Gebauer

Snacks and drinks in the museum’s entrance hall. Photo: Alexandra Meyer

 

Der Standard on Degen’s research project on arctic benthic communities

Der Standard recently published an article on Renate Degen’s (University of Vienna) Artcic Traits Project. Read the full article here.

 

Polar Talk #1: Leben mit und vom Bergbau – First Nations in Kanadas Yukon Territory

     Polar Talks


Polar Talk #1

Dr. Gertrude Saxinger: “Leben mit und vom Bergbau – First Nations in Kanadas Yukon Territory”

Obwohl viele Ureinwohner/innen heute in den Minen arbeiten, sind auch Subsistenzwirtschaft und Jagen zentrale Bestandteile ihrer Identität und des dörflichen Zusammenlebens. Der Vortrag führt an diesem Beispiel in die Anthropologie des Zirkumpolaren Nordens ein.

Dr. Gertrude Saxinger, Institut für Kultur- und Sozialanthropologie und Austrian Polar Research Institute (APRI) – Forschungsgruppe Social and Cultural Systems

Wann: Mittwoch, 17.01.2018, 18:30 Uhr
Wo: Naturhistorisches Museum Wien, Vortragssaal
Eintritt frei

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Polar Talks ist eine neue Vortragsreihe des Austrian Polar Research Institute (APRI) in der österreichische PolarforscherInnen aus den Natur- und Sozialwissenschaften allgemein verständlich über ihre Forschung in polaren Gebieten berichten.